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Books of the Week: “OH NO!” and “Ada Lace, on the Case”

Oct 30, 2017 | By: Isabel Huff

Books of the Week: “OH NO!” and “Ada Lace, on the Case” thumbnail

Welcome 

...to our new series of blog posts featuring books reviews!  As part of our ongoing research about what's "out there" for engaging children and young teens in STEM, we've been reading books that include STEM characters, themes, or concepts.  Every week we'll be posting reviews of books so check back often—especially with the holiday season coming up!

(we found some of these books through other lists, like this one, this one, and this one, but the reviews are our own)

Now, on to our first reviews:

OH NO! (Or how my science project destroyed the world)

by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Dan Santat

A very short, fun book about a girl whose science fair robot begins to destroy the world. She creates a giant frog to stop it, but then it starts destroying the world! A great conversation starter about ethics and STEM (particularly about considering the possible negative consequences of a technology before creating it).

Ada Lace, on the Case

by Emily Calandrelli with Tamson Weston, illustrated by Renee Kurilla

A sweet story about a girl and her new friend who try to figure out where the neighborhood dog went by spying on various neighbors and observing the neighborhood “ecosystem.” Ada realizes that her friend Nina’s wild ideas actually help her and make things more fun. There are a few science concepts included in the book that might go over the heads of the age of children for whom the book is written (feedback loops, the Turing Test). However, educators could use these as starting points for discussions/explanations of those topics.

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From the Through My Window Video Library

What would you do if you saw a friend cheating on a test?

Engineers face ethical dilemmas, too, and those faced by children and young teens have parallels to those faced by engineers.

 

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. 1223868 and 1223460.  Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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